The effects of television commercial repetition

Also examined are the effects of multiple exposures and the effects of social setting size of the audience.

The effects of television commercial repetition

Ksobiech, Kenneth Abstract In advertising literature, "repetition" and "involvement" are among the most frequently subjected research issues.

The effects of television commercial repetition

Evidently, two most debated issues, too. Moderating effects of advertising message involvement over repetition effects were extremely confusing subject.

It took for a long time to combine the previous research, and to construct a comprehensive theoretical framework. There are several conceptual definitions of involvement, and that much operationalizations of the concept.

Choosing the appropriate one, which was advertising message involvement, required a substantial amount of time and work. Literature of repetition includes several theories and models explain its effects. Instead of choosing a single theory, I sought the common grounds of them.

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Eventually, the tripartite model of attitudes helped me to categorize major repetition theories under the subtitles of affective, cognitive, and conative responses. Unlike the hierarchy of effects models, tripartite model of attitudes proposes that affect, cognition, and conation are not hierarchically different, but they are separate components of attitudes.

This explanation seems to have more face validity than any other theoretical explanations. A combination of major theory categorizations became the baseline from which hypotheses were derived. An experiment consisted of a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial design was conducted to measure immediate and delayed effects of repetition moderated by advertising message involvement on the attitudes.

While advertising repetition served as a within-subjects treatment, level of involvement high vs. Specifically, the level of advertising message involvement showed significant effects on the cognitive, affective, and conative responses of subjects.

Effects of Television Commercial Repetition | Free Essays - schwenkreis.com

This research not only combined the different theories of repetition into the attitude components, but also provided evidence that advertising message involvement is an important moderating variable on the attitude formation resulted from exposure to television commercials.

Master's Theses Access restricted to Marquette Campus.The following predictionsconcerningthe effects of television commercial message repetition on the relevancy and mediatingrole of cognitive responses will be examined: H2: The frequency of topic-irrelevant ideation increases as exposure to a television commercial increases.

Effects of Television Commercial Repetition, Receiver Knowledge, and Commercial Length: A repetition effects have been borrowed from the social Effects of Television Commercial Repetition, Receiver Knowledge, and Commercial Length: A Test of the Two-Factor Model.

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knowledge and commercial length did not moderate these processes. Effects of Television Commercial Repetition, Receiver Knowledge, and Commercial Length: A Test of the Two-Factor Model The effects of repeated exposure to an advertising message have long been of considerable basic and prag- matic interest to marketers.

The following predictionsconcerningthe effects of television commercial message repetition on the relevancy and mediatingrole of cognitive responses will be examined: H2: The frequency of topic-irrelevant ideation increases as exposure to a television commercial increases.

The effects of television commercial repetition

Many advertisers have argued that second television commercials should be used only to reinforce effects created by longer commercials. However, this recommendation is based on studies that have several weaknesses, including use of single exposure levels, established commercials, and learning as the primary dependent variable.

The cognitive effects of advertising repetition are examined by considering the impact of three levels of TV commercial exposure within a one-hour program. Attitudes and purchase intentions were not affected by message repetition, although cognitive responses .